Why You Should Stay Off Social Media During Divorce

Why You Should Stay Off Social Media During Divorce

Social media is everywhere nowadays, allowing anyone with access to the internet to share everything from their personal photos of vacations and fancy dinners to their innermost thoughts, feelings, and ideas. With so many different platforms to share and stay in contact with friends, family, and acquaintances, it is almost impossible to avoid at this point. Social media might have once belonged to more youthful generations, but now even our grandparents are logging in to share memes. While this innovative way of sharing is great for keeping people connected, it can prove to be detrimental to those who are in the midst of a legal matter, including divorce, providing ample sources of evidence that can ultimately be used against a person.

If you are currently getting divorced, or are about to, you need to rethink your use of social media to protect yourself and the outcome of your case. Below are some reasons why you should consider unplugging throughout the course of your divorce:

  • Posts can be taken out of context: A lot of posts might seem harmless, but remember that anything can be taken out of context. If you post a picture of yourself cutting loose with some of your friends to unwind from the stress of your divorce, your spouse might use this in court to claim that you are irresponsible and spend every night out, drinking. Almost anything that appears to be totally innocent can be twisted into a different and much more harmful narrative.
  • A post you made contradicts a statement you made in court: If you were to make a statement in court and then post something on social media that directly contradicts it, you are going to get into a lot of trouble. For example, if you said you are broke and struggling with money, but then post the cool, new couch you just purchased, or write about how you are going on an exotic vacation, this is going to come back to haunt you in court. Never forget that being dishonest in court will cost you.
  • You share detailed posts about your divorce: Of course, everyone understands that you are frustrated and stressed out with your divorce, but actually posting about it on social media, or saying how much of a jerk your soon-to-be ex-spouse is will only do you harm. Aside from making you look bitter, it will also give opposing counsel a head’s up on what to expect in court, especially when you are spilling all the details online.
  • Posts from your loved ones: Posts about your loved ones can also have an effect on your divorce case. If you son graduates from high school and attends a party afterward to celebrate where alcoholic drinks are served, and he gets tagged in pictures where he and his friends are consuming alcohol, this could be a big problem. Your spouse’s attorney will likely use this as evidence to argue that you are an unfit parent, even if you punished your son later for drinking.

Ultimately, the best way to protect your case from the dangers of social media is to refrain from using it until your case is resolved. You should also ask your friends and family not to make any posts regarding your divorce or to tag you or your children in any posts. If you absolutely need to use social media, set your profile to private and unfriend and block your ex and his or her friends and family from social media. If you are ever in doubt of what is okay to post, ask your attorney.

Divorce Attorney in La Mesa

No one ever gets married with the expectation that they will eventually divorce, but it still happens all the same. This process is often emotional and stressful to endure, but with the help of a skilled divorce attorney, it can go more smoothly. At The Law Offices of Andrea Schneider, you will receive the knowledgeable and compassionate representation you deserve to get started on the next chapter of your life.

Get started on your case and give my office a call at (619) 304-8499 to learn more about my divorce services.

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